Pilot CWS-R-SAP – v. 2 Redesigned System, 5.3 Federally Approved New In-Home Services

 

Pilot Child Welfare System Redesign

Strategic Action Plan

 

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5.3 Federally Approved New In-Home Services

 

The Title IV- E Prevention Services Clearinghouse was established by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to conduct an objective and transparent review of research on programs and services intended to provide enhanced support to children and families and prevent foster care placements.[1]

 

The Prevention Services Clearinghouse, developed in accordance with the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA) as codified in Title IV-E of the Social Security Act, rates programs and services as well-supported, supported, promising, or does not currently meet criteria.[2] Only programs and services rated as well-supported or supported are displayed below, because those are the two ratings accepted for Title IV-E.

 

5.3.1. Well-Supported Programs

A well-supported practice has at least two studies with non-overlapping samples carried out in usual care or practice settings that achieved a rating of moderate or high on design and execution and demonstrated favorable effects in a target outcome domain. At least one of the studies demonstrated a sustained favorable effect of at least 12 months beyond the end of treatment on at least one target outcome.

 

5.3.2. Parents as Teachers   Last Reviewed: Jun 2019

Subdomains with favorable impacts   Child safety, Child well-being: Social functioning, Child well-being: Cognitive functions and abilities. Target audience: teen parents, low income, parental low educational attainment, history of substance abuse in the family, and chronic health conditions.[3]

 

Parents as Teachers (PAT) is a home-visiting parent education program that teaches new and expectant parents skills intended to promote positive child development and prevent child maltreatment. PAT aims to increase parent knowledge of early childhood development, improve parenting practices, promote early detection of developmental delays and health issues, prevent child abuse and neglect, and increase school readiness and success.

 

The PAT model includes four core components: personal home visits, supportive group connection events, child health and developmental screenings, and community resource networks. PAT is designed so that it can be delivered to diverse families with diverse needs, although PAT sites typically target families with specific risk factors.

 

Families can begin the program prenatally and continue through when their child enters kindergarten. Services are offered on a biweekly or monthly basis, depending on family needs. Sessions are typically held for one hour in the family’s home, but can also be delivered in schools, childcare centers, or other community spaces.

 

Each participant is assigned a parent educator who must have a high school degree or GED with two or more years of experience working with children and parents. Parent educators must also attend five days of PAT training.

 

Target Population:  PAT offers services to new and expectant parents, starting prenatally and continuing until their child reaches kindergarten. PAT is a home visiting model that is designed to be used in any community and with any family during early childhood. However, many PAT programs target families in possible high-risk environments such as teen parents, low income, parental low educational attainment, history of substance abuse in the family, and chronic health conditions.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation[4]

 

Dosage:  Families can receive services prenatally until their child starts kindergarten. Parent educators meet with families for about an hour at a time. The frequency of meetings can range from biweekly to monthly, based on need.

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  PAT is usually delivered in homes, but can also be delivered in schools, childcare centers, or other community spaces.

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  Parent educators must have a high school degree or GED with two or more years of experience working with children and parents. In order to receive their PAT certification, all parent educators must attend a three-day foundational training. They must also attend a two-day model implementation training that covers strategies used to implement PAT. The PAT National Center also offers technical assistance and certification renewal sessions.

 

Program or Service Documentation:  Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

 

PAT has a Model Implementation Library with resources available to those who receive PAT training related to supporting supervisors, implementation, data collection, ethical considerations, and technical assistance. Depending on the ages of the families served, the PAT Foundational Curriculum is available to support families prenatal to 3 and the PAT Foundational 2 Curriculum is available to support families 3 through Kindergarten. For more information, visit the PAT website.

 

Available languages:  Materials for PAT have been translated into Spanish, French, Mandarin, and German.

 

Contact Information for Developers

Website: https://parentsasteachers.org/

Phone: (314) 432-4330

Email: allison.kemner@parentsasteachers.org  or kerry.caverly@parentsasteachers.org[5]

 

5.3.3. Nurse-Family Partnership   Last Reviewed: Jun 2019

Subdomains with favorable impacts:  Child safety, Child well-being: Cognitive functions and abilities, Child well-being: Physical development and health, Adult well-being: Economic and housing stability. Audience: young, first-time, low-income mothers beginning early in their pregnancy until the child turns two.[6]

 

Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) is a home-visiting program that is typically implemented by trained registered nurses. NFP serves young, first-time, low-income mothers beginning early in their pregnancy until the child turns two.

 

The primary aims of NFP are to improve the health, relationships, and economic well-being of mothers and their children. Typically, nurses provide support related to individualized goal setting, preventative health practices, parenting skills, and educational and career planning. However, the content of the program can vary based on the needs and requests of the mother.

 

NFP aims for 60 visits that last 60-75 minutes each in the home or a location of the mother’s choosing. For the first month after enrollment, visits occur weekly. Then, they are held bi-weekly or on an as-needed basis.

 

Target Population:  NFP is intended to serve young, first-time, low-income mothers from early pregnancy through their child’s first two years. Though the program primarily focuses on mothers and children, NFP also encourages the participation of fathers and other family members.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation

 

Dosage:  Mothers enroll early in their pregnancy (no later than the 28th week of gestation) and may continue with the program until their child turns two. During this time NFP aims for 60 visits that last approximately 60-75 minutes each. During the first month after enrollment, nurses visit mothers weekly. After the first month, the visits continue on a biweekly basis or as-needed.

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  NFP is delivered through one-on-one visits in the home or a location of the mother’s choice.

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  Registered nurses with a bachelor’s degree or higher typically deliver NFP. They are required to complete all educational sessions with the NFP National Service Office (NSO). In-person and online trainings provide guidance on how to implement the program model with fidelity. They also provide guidance on how nurses can successfully develop therapeutic relationships with mothers. NFP nurses also participate in ongoing, regular meetings with staff members and NSO supervisors.

 

Program or Service Documentation:  Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

 

Visit-to-Visit guidelines and other materials are available to those who attend the NFP trainings.

 

Available languages:  NFP training materials are offered in both English and Spanish.

 

Contact Information for Developers

Website: https://www.nursefamilypartnership.org/

Phone: (866) 864-5226

Email: support@nursefamilypartnership.org[7]

 

5.3.4. Motivational Interviewing  Last Reviewed: Nov 2019

Subdomains with favorable impacts:  Adult well-being: Parent/caregiver substance use. Audience: illicit substance and alcohol use or abuse among youth and adults, and nicotine or tobacco use among youth under the age of 18.[8]

 

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a method of counseling clients designed to promote behavior change and improve physiological, psychological, and lifestyle outcomes. MI aims to identify ambivalence for change and increase motivation by helping clients progress through five stages of change: pre-contemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance. It aims to do this by encouraging clients to consider their personal goals and how their current behaviors may compete with attainment of those goals.

 

MI uses clinical strategies to help clients identify reasons to change their behavior and reinforce that behavior change is possible. These clinical strategies include the use of open-ended questions and reflective listening. MI can be used to promote behavior change with a range of target populations and for a variety of problem areas.

 

The Prevention Services Clearinghouse reviewed studies of MI focused on illicit substance and alcohol use or abuse among youth and adults, and nicotine or tobacco use among youth under the age of 18. MI is typically delivered over one to three sessions with each session lasting about 30 to 50 minutes. Sessions are often used prior to or in conjunction with other therapies or programs.

 

They are usually conducted in community agencies, clinical office settings, care facilities, or hospitals. While there are no required qualifications for individuals to deliver MI, training can be provided by MINT (Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers) certified trainers.

 

In accordance with the Handbook of Standards and Procedures, if after review of 15 studies a program or service has not achieved a rating of well-supported, additional studies are reviewed until the program or service has achieved a rating of well-supported or all eligible studies have been reviewed. For Motivational Interviewing, 30 studies were reviewed in depth, in order of prioritization.

 

Target Population:  MI can be used to promote behavior change with a range of target populations and for a variety of problem areas.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation[9]

 

Dosage:  MI is typically delivered over one to three sessions. Each session typically lasts for 30 to 50 minutes. The dosage may vary if MI is delivered in conjunction with other treatment(s).

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  MI sessions are usually conducted in community agencies, clinical office settings, care facilities, or hospitals.

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  There are no minimum qualifications for MI providers. MI can be used by a variety of different professionals. The Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) does not recommend specific trainings. However, they provide online training resources, contact information for MI trainers, and information about public trainings by MINT members.

 

Program or Service Documentation:  Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

 

The following resource was created by the program developers and includes information about implementation of MI:

 

Miller, W.R. & Rollnick, S. (2012). Motivational Interviewing, Third Edition: Helping People Change. Guilford Press.

 

Available languages:  Materials for MI are available in many languages including: Bulgarian, Chinese, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish, Swedish, and Turkish.

 

Contact Information for Developers

Website: https://motivationalinterviewing.org/

Email: admin@motivationalinterviewing.org[10]

 

5.3.5. Functional Family Therapy Last Reviewed: Jun 2019

Subdomains with favorable impacts:  Child well-being: Behavioral and emotional functioning, Child well-being: Substance use, Child well-being: Delinquent behavior, Adult well-being: Family functioning. Audience: 11 to 18 year old youth who have been referred for behavioral or emotional problems[11]

 

Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is a short term prevention program for at-risk youth and their families. FFT aims to address risk and protective factors that impact the adaptive development of 11 to 18 year old youth who have been referred for behavioral or emotional problems. The program is organized in multiple phases and focuses on developing a positive relationship between therapist/program and family, increasing motivation for change, identifying specific needs of the family, supporting individual skill-building of youth and family, and generalizing changes to a broader context.

 

Typically, therapists will meet weekly with families face-to-face for 60 to 90 minutes and by phone for up to 30 minutes, over an average of three to six months. Master’s level therapists provide FFT. They work as a part of a FFT-supervised unit and receive ongoing support from their local unit and FFT training organization.

 

Target Population:  FFT is intended for 11 to 18 year old youth who have been referred for behavioral or emotional problems by juvenile justice, mental health, school, or child welfare systems. Family discord is also a target factor for this program.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation[12]

 

Dosage:  Typically, therapists will meet weekly with families face-to-face for 60 to 90 minutes and by phone for up to 30 minutes. Most families complete the FFT program in an average of 8 to 14 sessions over the span of three to six months.

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  Typically, FFT is conducted in clinic and home settings. It can also be delivered in schools, child welfare facilities, probation and parole offices, aftercare systems, and mental health facilities.

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  FFT therapists are required to have a Master’s degree. Training for FFT is offered by FFT LLC and FFT Associates.

 

FFT LLC’s training includes three phases: clinical, supervision, and maintenance. In the clinical training phase, local clinicians are trained on the FFT model through weekly consultations and activities (typically over the span of 12 to 18 months).

 

In the supervision phase, a local site staff are trained to serve as FFT supervisors through a one-day onsite training, two two-day trainings, and monthly consultations. During the maintenance phase, FFT LLC staff continue to review the delivery trends and client outcomes and provide an annual one-day onsite training. FFT Associates’ training is organized in four phases: 1) implementation and planning, 2) applying the FFT model, 3) development of on-site clinical supervision and quality assurance systems, and 4) on-going support (continuing education, technical assistance, and quality improvement). After teams have successfully completed the first 3 training phases, they are certified as FFT Practice Centers.

 

Program or Service Documentation: Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

 

There are two training organizations for FFT. Each offers a manual.

 

Alexander, J. F., Waldron, H. B., Robbins, M. S., & Neeb, A. A. (2013). Functional Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavioral Problems. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Sexton, T. L., (2010).  Functional Family Therapy in Clinical Practice:  An Evidence Based Treatment Model for at risk adolescents.  Routledge:  New York, NY.

 

Available languages:  Materials are available in languages other than English, including Dutch, Spanish, Swedish.

 

Contact Information for Developers

Functional Family Therapy, Inc.

Website: https://www.fftllc.com/

Functional Family Therapy Associates

Website: https://www.functionalfamilytherapy.com/[13]

 

5.3.6. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy        Last Reviewed: Feb 2020

Subdomains with favorable impacts:  Child well-being: Behavioral and emotional functioning, Adult well-being: Positive parenting practices, Adult well-being: Parent/caregiver mental or emotional health. Audience: two to seven-year old children and their parents or caregivers that aims to decrease externalizing child behavior problems, increase positive parenting behaviors, and improve the quality of the parent-child relationship.[14]

 

In Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), parents are coached by a trained therapist in behavior-management and relationship skills. PCIT is a program for two to seven-year old children and their parents or caregivers that aims to decrease externalizing child behavior problems, increase positive parenting behaviors, and improve the quality of the parent-child relationship.

 

During weekly sessions, therapists coach caregivers in skills such as child-centered play, communication, increasing child compliance, and problem-solving. Therapists use “bug-in-the-ear” technology to provide live coaching to parents or caregivers from behind a one-way mirror (there are some modifications in which live same-room coaching is also used).

 

Parents or caregivers progress through treatment as they master specific competencies, thus there is no fixed length of treatment. Most families are able to achieve mastery of the program content in 12 to 20 one-hour sessions. Master’s level therapists who have received specialized training provide PCIT services to children and caregivers.

 

Target Population:  PCIT is typically appropriate for families with children who are between two and seven years old and experience emotional and behavioral problems that are frequent and intense.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation

 

Dosage:  PCIT is typically delivered over 12-20 weekly hour-long sessions, but the exact treatment length varies based on the needs of the child and family. Treatment is considered complete when a positive parent-child relationship is established, the parent can effectively manage the child’s behavior, and the child’s behavior is within normal limits on a behavior rating scale.

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  PCIT is usually delivered in playroom settings where therapists can observe behaviors through a one-way mirror. By using the one-way mirror therapists can provide verbal direction and support to the parent using a wireless earphone. Video technology can also be used to deliver the program in other environments such as the home.

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  To become a certified PCIT therapist, individuals must be a licensed mental health provider with a master’s degree (or higher) in a mental health field or a third year psychology doctoral student who works under the supervision of a licensed mental health service provider.

 

Individuals must also complete 40-hours of training with PCIT trainers and approved materials. Although online-based trainings are offered, at least 30 of the 40 required hours must be in face-to-face training.

 

Additional information about these trainings can be found on the PCIT International website.

 

Program or Service Documentation:  Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

 

The Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Protocol is designed for PCIT-trained therapists and includes session outlines, forms, handouts, and teacher information.

Eyberg, S. & Funderburk, B. (2011) Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Protocol: 2011. PCIT International, Inc.

 

Available languages:  Materials are available in languages other than English, including Spanish.

 

Contact Information for Developers

Website: http://www.pcit.org/

Email: pcit.international@gmail.com[15]

 

5.3.7. Multisystemic Therapy        Last Reviewed: Feb 2020

Subdomains with favorable impacts:  Child permanency, Child well-being: Behavioral and emotional functioning, Child well-being: Substance use, Child well-being: Delinquent behavior, Adult well-being: Positive parenting practices, Adult well-being: Parent/caregiver mental or emotional health, Adult well-being: Family functioning. Audience: promote pro-social behavior and reduce criminal activity, mental health symptomology, out-of-home placements, and illicit substance use in 12- to 17-year-old youth.[16]

 

Multisystemic Therapy (MST) is an intensive treatment for troubled youth delivered in multiple settings. This program aims to promote pro-social behavior and reduce criminal activity, mental health symptomology, out-of-home placements, and illicit substance use in 12- to 17-year-old youth.

 

The MST program addresses the core causes of delinquent and antisocial conduct by identifying key drivers of the behaviors through an ecological assessment of the youth, his or her family, and school and community. The intervention strategies are personalized to address the identified drivers.

 

The program is delivered for an average of three to five months, and services are available 24/7, which enables timely crisis management and allows families to choose which times will work best for them. Master’s level therapists from licensed MST providers take on only a small caseload at any given time so that they can be available to meet their clients’ needs.

 

Target Population:  This program provides services to youth between the ages of 12 and 17 and their families. Target populations include youth who are at risk for or are engaging in delinquent activity or substance misuse, experience mental health issues, and are at-risk for out-of-home placement.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation

 

Dosage:  Treatment using MST typically involves multiple weekly visits between the therapist and family, over an average timespan of 3 to 5 months. The intensity of services can vary based on clinical needs. The therapist and family work together to determine how often and when services should be provided throughout the course of treatment.

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  Therapists can deliver the program in multiple settings, including home, school, and community. Therapists may also work directly with these settings as part of the treatment plan.

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  MST is delivered by therapists who work for licensed MST teams and organizations. MST therapists, supervisors, and other staff complete an initial five day training. This training is provided by Ph.D. and Master’s level mental-health specialists. Therapists that deliver MST also participate in ongoing trainings. These include quarterly clinically-focused booster sessions that aim to refresh MST skills and weekly consultations provided by MST experts. MST teams use a structured fidelity assessment approach to ensure clinical service delivery is consistent with the MST model.

 

For more information, please visit the MST Training webpage.

 

Program or Service Documentation:  Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review[17]

 

Multisystemic Therapy for Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents, Second Edition is intended for clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, counselors, researchers, and students. It describes the principles of MST and provides guidelines for implementing the program.

 

Henggeler, S. W., Schoenwald, S. K., Borduin, C. M., Rowland, M. D., & Cunningham, P. B. (2009). Multisystemic Therapy for Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents (2nd ed.). New York: The Guilford Press.

 

Available languages:  Materials are available in languages other than English, including Norwegian, several other European languages, and Spanish.

 

Contact Information for Developers

Website: http://www.mstservices.com/

Phone: (843) 856-8226

Email: info@mstservices.com

 

5.3.8. Healthy Families America  Last Reviewed: Feb 2020

Subdomains with favorable impacts:  Child safety, Child well-being: Behavioral and emotional functioning, Child well-being: Cognitive functions and abilities, Child well-being: Delinquent behavior, Child well-being: Educational Achievement and Attainment, Adult well-being: Positive parenting practices, Adult well-being: Parent/caregiver mental or emotional health, Adult well-being: Family functioning. Audience: new and expectant families with children who are at-risk for maltreatment or adverse childhood experiences.[18]

 

Healthy Families America (HFA) is a home visiting program for new and expectant families with children who are at-risk for maltreatment or adverse childhood experiences. HFA is a nationally accredited program that was developed by Prevent Child Abuse America.

 

The overall goals of the program are to cultivate and strengthen nurturing parent-child relationships, promote healthy childhood growth and development, and enhance family functioning by reducing risk and building protective factors. HFA includes screening and assessments to identify families most in need of services, offering intensive, long-term and culturally responsive services to both parent(s) and children, and linking families to a medical provider and other community services as needed. Each HFA site is able to determine which family and parent characteristics it targets.

 

Enrollment begins prenatally and continues up to three months after birth. Most families are offered services for a minimum of three years, and receive weekly home visits at the start. After six months, families receive visits less frequently depending on their needs and progress. All HFA home visiting staff must have a minimum of a high school diploma or equivalent and are required to attend a four-day core training and receive supplemental wrap-around training. Supervisors and Program Managers must also complete additional training to supplement core training. All staff are encouraged to seek Infant Mental Health endorsement.

 

Target Population:  Families are eligible to receive HFA services beginning prenatally or within three months of birth. This program is designed to serve the families of children who have increased risk for maltreatment or other adverse childhood experiences. Each HFA site is able to determine which family and parent characteristics it targets. For example, sites may choose to target low-income families, single parent households, or families who have experienced substance use, mental health issues, or domestic violence.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation[19]

 

Dosage:  Services begin as early as prenatally and continue for a minimum of three years. For the first six months after birth, families are offered at least one in-home visit per week, approximately an hour in duration. After six months, families may move to less frequent visits (bi-weekly and then monthly). Movement to less frequent visits depends on the needs and progress of the family and in times of crisis, visit frequency can increase.

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  Services are usually delivered in the family’s home.

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  HFA home visiting staff must have at least a high school diploma or equivalent, experience providing services to families, and knowledge of child development. Supervisors and Program Managers must have at least a Bachelor’s degree with three years prior experience. All HFA staff are encouraged to seek Infant Mental Health endorsement.

 

The National Office offers several trainings for HFA staff. All staff are required to attend a four-day core training that is specialized based on role (assessors, home visitors, and supervisors). Supervisors attend one additional day for the core training and an optional three days of training that focuses on building reflective supervision skills.

 

Program managers are required to attend core training plus three days of training focused on how to implement the model to fidelity using HFA’s Best Practice Standards. HFA also offers supplemental online training, advanced trainings, and on-site technical assistance.

 

Program or Service Documentation:  Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

 

For traditional HFA, manuals are made available as a part of the core training sessions. More information about core trainings and access to traditional HFA manuals can be found through the HFA website.

 

Available languages:  Materials for traditional HFA are available in English and Spanish.

 

Contact Information for Developers

Website: https://www.healthyfamiliesamerica.org

Phone: (312) 663-3520

Email: hfamail@preventchildabuse.org[20]

 

5.3.9. Brief Strategic Family Therapy    Last Reviewed: Mar 2020

Subdomains with favorable impacts:  Child well-being: Behavioral and emotional functioning, Child well-being: Delinquent behavior, Adult well-being: Parent/caregiver substance use, Adult well-being: Family functioning.[21]

 

Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) uses a structured family systems approach to treat families with children or adolescents (6 to 17 years) who display or are at risk for developing problem behaviors including substance abuse, conduct problems, and delinquency. There are three intervention components.

 

First, counselors establish relationships with family members to better understand and ‘join’ the family system. Second, counselors observe how family members behave with one another in order to identify interactional patterns that are associated with problematic youth behavior. Third, counselors work in the present, using reframes, assigning tasks and coaching family members to try new ways of relating to one another to promote more effective and adaptive family interactions.

 

BSFT is typically delivered in 12 to 16 weekly sessions in community centers, clinics, health agencies, or homes. BSFT counselors are required to participate in four phases of training and are expected to have training and/or experience with basic clinical skills common to many behavioral interventions and family systems theory.

 

Target Population:  BSFT is designed for families with children or adolescents (6 to 17 years) who display or are at risk for developing problem behaviors including: drug use and dependency, antisocial peer associations, bullying, or truancy.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation[22]

 

Dosage:  BSFT is typically delivered in 12 to 16 weekly sessions, depending on individual and family needs.

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  BSFT can be delivered in a variety of settings such as community centers, clinics, health agencies, and homes.

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  BSFT is delivered by trained therapists, typically with at least a master’s degrees in social work, marriage and family therapy, psychology or a related field. Therapists are expected to have training and/or experience with basic clinical skills common to many behavioral interventions and family systems theory.

 

BSFT training consists of live workshops that address especially complex clinical dilemmas and allow time for therapists to practice essential skills. The workshops are a combination of didactics, practice exercises and videotape analysis of BSFT family sessions. They also include clinical case consultations and live family sessions if desired.

 

BSFT training also consists of a supervision practicum that begins 1-2 weeks after the initial workshop and continues for 4-6 months depending on trainee advancement. This supervision practicum entails weekly phone reviews of the trainees’ electronically recorded BSFT family therapy sessions, along with group feedback and consultation.

 

Sites that wish to offer BSFT are initially required to demonstrate readiness for integrating the BSFT program into their organization. To that end, a Site Readiness process is implemented prior to training. After sites successfully complete training and meet competency and fidelity requirements, they are then licensed. Both the Brief Strategic Family Therapy Institute and the Family Therapy Training Institute of Miami license sites.

 

Program or Service Documentation:  Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

 

Szapocznik, J. Hervis, O., & Schwartz, S. (2003). Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abuse. NIH Pub. No. 03-4751. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse.

 

Available languages:  Materials for BSFT are available in English and Spanish.

Contact Information for Developers

 

Brief Strategic Family Therapy® Institute

(305) 243-7585

bsft@med.miami.edu

http://www.bsft.org/

 

Family Therapy Training Institute of Miami

(305) 859-2121

info@bsft-av.com

https://brief-strategic-family-therapy.com/[23]

 

5.3.10. Homebuilders – Intensive Family Preservation and Reunification Services        Last Reviewed: Mar 2020

Subdomains with favorable impacts:  Child permanency, Adult well-being: Economic and housing stability.[24]

 

Homebuilders provides intensive, in-home counseling, skill building and support services for families who have children (0-18 years old) at imminent risk of out-of-home placement or who are in placement and cannot be reunified without intensive in-home services. Homebuilders practitioners conduct behaviorally specific, ongoing, and holistic assessments that include information about family strengths, values, and barriers to goal attainment.

 

Homebuilders practitioners then collaborate with family members and referents in developing intervention goals and corresponding service plans. These intervention goals and service plans focus on factors directly related to the risk of out-of-home placement or reunification. Throughout the intervention the practitioner develops safety plans and uses clinical strategies designed to promote safety. Homebuilders utilizes research-based intervention strategies including Motivational Interviewing, a variety of cognitive and behavioral strategies, and teaching methods intended to teach new skills and facilitate behavior change.

 

Practitioners support families by providing concrete goods and services related to the intervention goals, collaborating with formal and informal community supports and systems, and teaching family members to advocate for themselves. Homebuilders services are concentrated during a period of 4 to 6 weeks with the goal of preventing out-of-home placements and achieving reunifications. Homebuilders therapists typically have small caseloads of 2 families at a time. Families typically receive 40 or more hours of direct face-to-face services. The family’s therapist is available to family members 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.

 

Treatment services primarily take place in the client’s home. Providers are required to have a master’s degree in social work, psychology, counseling, or a closely related field or a bachelor’s degree in social work, psychology, counseling, or a closely related field with at least 2 years of related experience.

Target Population:  Homebuilders serves families who have children (0-18 years old) at imminent risk of out-of-home placement or who are in placement and cannot be reunified without intensive in-home services.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation[25]

 

Dosage:  Homebuilders services are concentrated during a period of 4 to 6 weeks. Families typically receive 40 or more hours of direct face-to-face services. The family’s Homebuilders practitioner is available to family members 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, with primary back up from the Homebuilders supervisor. Services are tailored and sessions are flexibly scheduled based on the family members’ needs, goals, values, culture, circumstance, learning styles and abilities.

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  Treatment services primarily take place in the client’s home. Services are provided when and where the family needs them, including other community locations (e.g. school).

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  Homebuilders practitioners are required to have a master’s or bachelor’s degree in psychology, social work, counseling, or a closely related field. Practitioners with a bachelor’s degree are also required to have at least two years of related experience working with children and families.

Supervisors and program managers are also required to have a master’s or bachelor’s degree in social work, psychology, counseling or a closely related field.

 

Those with a master’s must have at least two years of experience working with children and families. Those with a bachelor’s degree must have at least four years of experience as a Homebuilders practitioner. If they do not have prior Homebuilders experience, supervisors must complete at least six Homebuilders interventions during their first year.

 

Practitioners, supervisors and program managers receive initial and ongoing training, consultation and support to deliver quality services and ensure fidelity to the Homebuilders model. The Homebuilders Quality Enhancement System (QUEST) includes start up consultation and technical assistance, webinars, 15 -17 days of workshop training for all staff during  the first two years, an additional 2-4 days of workshop training for supervisors and program managers, ongoing team and supervisor consultation with a highly trained and experienced Homebuilders consultant, fidelity reviews and site visits.

 

Program or Service Documentation:  Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

 

Kinney, J., Haapala, D. A., & Booth, C. (1991). Keeping families together: The HOMEBUILDERS model. New York, NY: Taylor Francis.

 

Available languages:  Materials are available in English. Some documents and tools are also available in Spanish.

 

Contact Information for Developers

Website: www.institutefamily.org

Email: info@institutefamily.org[26]

 

5.3.11. Supported Programs

A supported practice has at least one study carried out in a usual care or practice setting which achieved a rating of moderate or high on design and execution and demonstrated a sustained favorable effect of at least 6 months beyond the end of treatment on at least one target outcome.[27]

 

5.3.12. Families Facing the Future Last Reviewed: Jun 2019

Subdomains with favorable impacts:  Adult well-being: Parent/caregiver substance use[28]

 

Families Facing the Future (FFF) (formerly known as Focus on Families) is an intensive program for parents in methadone treatment who have children or young adolescents. FFF teaches parenting and relapse prevention skills to parents and aims to protect their at-risk children from adverse outcomes, including drug use.

 

Case managers work collaboratively with families to identify positive activities, connect them with available services, and identify ways to reinforce use of new skills.

 

Typically, families attend a five-hour group retreat at the beginning of the FFF program. Then, parent(s) attend 90-minute group sessions twice a week for 16 weeks in an outpatient clinic. Children participate in 12 of these sessions. Families also receive approximately two hours of in-home case management per week.

 

This program is delivered by case managers who have a master’s, background in chemical dependency and parenting, and attended a three-day training.

Target Population:  FFF aims to serve families with one or more parents receiving methadone treatment who have children or young adolescents.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation[29]

 

Dosage:  To begin the program, families attend a five-hour group retreat that focuses on family goal setting. Then, parent(s) attend 90-minute group sessions twice a week for 16 weeks for a total of 32 sessions. Children attend 12 of these sessions with their parent(s). Families also receive approximately two hours of in-home case management per week.

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  FFF includes group sessions that take place in an outpatient clinic. FFF also includes case management that occurs in the family’s homes.

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  Case managers must have a master’s degree as well as training in chemical dependency and parenting. Case managers must attend three days of on-site training.

 

Program or Service Documentation:  Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

 

The FFF curriculum can be found on the developer’s website. The curriculum includes descriptions of the different session-types and a list of the topics that are covered in each of the sessions.

 

Haggerty, K. P., Mills, E., & Catalano, R. F. (1993). Families Facing the Future: Curriculum.

 

Available languages:  Materials are available in English.

 

Contact Information for Developers

Website: http://www.sdrg.org/fffsummary.asp

Phone: (206) 685-1997

Email: sdrg@uw.edu[30]

 

5.3.13. SafeCare  Last Reviewed: Mar 2020

Subdomains with favorable impacts:  Child permanency[31]

 

SafeCare is an in-home behavioral parenting program that promotes positive parent-child interactions, informed caregiver response to childhood illness and injury, and a safe home environment.

 

SafeCare is designed for parents and caregivers of children birth through five who are either at-risk for or have a history of child neglect and/or physical abuse. The program aims to reduce child maltreatment. The SafeCare curriculum is delivered by trained and certified providers.

 

The curriculum includes three modules: (1) the home safety module targets risk factors for environmental neglect and unintentional injury by helping parents/caregivers identify and eliminate common household hazards and teaching them about age-appropriate supervision;

 

(2) the health module targets risk factors for medical neglect by teaching parents/caregivers how to identify and address illness, injury, and health generally;

 

(3) the parent-child/parent-infant interaction module targets risk factors associated with neglect and physical abuse by teaching parents/caregivers how to positively interact with their infant/child, and how to structure activities to engage their children and promote positive behavior.

 

Each module is designed to be delivered in 6 sessions (18 total), but some families may need fewer or more sessions to reach skill mastery. Each session typically lasts 50 to 90 minutes and is delivered in the family’s home or at another location of the parent’s choice.

 

Target Population:  SafeCare is designed for parents/caregivers of children 0-5 who are either at-risk for or have a history of child neglect and/or abuse.

 

Program or Service Delivery and Implementation[32]

 

Dosage:  SafeCare is designed to be completed in approximately 18 sessions, though some parents may need fewer or more sessions to master new skills. During this time, providers deliver three curriculum modules, with each module lasting for six sessions. Providers typically meet with clients weekly for about 50 to 90 minutes.

 

Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings:  SafeCare is delivered in the homes of participating parents/caregivers. If services cannot be delivered in the participating parent’s/caregiver’s home, an alternative setting can be used (e.g., clinic, shelter, family-based residential treatment center).

 

Education, Certifications and Training:  There are no educational requirements for SafeCare training. The National SafeCare Training and Research Center (NSTRC) provides training for providers. All providers are required to participate in 32 hours of workshop training and receive post-workshop coaching to promote fidelity and proficiency in delivering SafeCare to receive their certification. Ongoing coaching is required to keep provider certifications active. NSTRC also provides trainings for coaches and trainers.

Additional information about these trainings can be found on the NSTRC website.

 

Program or Service Documentation:  Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

 

Lutzker, J.R. (2016). Provider Manual, version 4.1.1.

 

Available languages:  Materials for SafeCare are available in French, Hebrew, and Spanish.

 

Contact Information for Developers

Website: www.safecare.org

Phone: (404) 413-1282

Email: safecare@gsu.edu[33]

 

[1] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/

[2] Ibid.

[3] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/111/show

[4] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/111/show

[5] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/111/show

[6] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/120/show

[7] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/120/show

[8] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/142/show

[9] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/142/show

[10] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/142/show

[11] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/154/show

[12] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/154/show

[13] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/154/show

[14] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/155/show

[15] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/155/show

[16] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/156/show

[17] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/156/show

[18] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/157/show

[19] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/157/show

[20] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/157/show

[21] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/171/show

[22] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/171/show

[23] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/171/show

[24] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/181/show

[25] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/181/show

[26] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/181/show

[27] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/109/show

[28] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/109/show

[29] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/109/show

[30] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/109/show

[31] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/169/show

[32] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/169/show

[33] https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/programs/169/show

 

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Blessings,

Jo Calk