Pilot CWS-R-SAP – v. 1 Current CWS, 13. In-Home Services

 

Pilot Child Welfare System Redesign

Strategic Action Plan

 

These webpages are a work in progress. They are open to the public to encourage comments, ideas, and improvements.

 

Previous Page                                                                                Next Page

 

13. In-Home Services

 

Recommended that, when child abuse or neglect has been found in the home, the child is never left in the home without a Child Safety Plan in addition to the Family In-Home Services plans. In most cases, when the child is removed from the home, the family receives In-Home Services to prepare for the reunification of the child into the home once it is safe for the child. Some examples of In-Home Services plans include drug and alcohol abuse treatment, stress reduction methods, job-hunting assistance, etc.

 

The following information is from the annual Data Books from 2009 through 2019, explaining the various types of In-Home Services used in the Oregon Child Welfare System. All bolding is added for emphasis; [data in brackets are comments not from the Data Books]:

 

2009:

  • critical investments made by the 2007 and 2009 Legislatures in several key areas of Oregon’s child welfare program (targeted addiction treatment and recovery services for parents; foster care reimbursement for relative caregivers and additional foster care reimbursement resources for all foster parents; enhanced legal reviews in child welfare cases; new technology supports; and additional child welfare staff)

 

  • strategic planning process that resulted in a set of goals in two critical focus areas: (1) safely and equitably reduce the number of children in foster care and (2) ensure that children in foster care are safe and healthy

 

  • in the 1970’s, Congress enacted the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), in response to a national crisis in which an alarmingly high percentage of Native American children were being removed from their families and tribal communities. ICWA assigns an enhanced responsibility to states to make “active efforts” to prevent removal of tribal children from their families

 

  • services to monitor in-home child safety may include parent training or other services that help support the parents’ ability to provide safety for their child. If a child cannot remain safely at home, he or she is placed in foster care and the family receives services to assist them in making changes that will allow their child to safely return home

 

FFY 2009 Family Services, by Type

Description Number of Services Number of Families Served
Family decision meeting facilitation   4,732 2,937
Parent training services   2,860 1,738
Intensive family services   2,314 1,494
Family sexual abuse treatment   1,065    619
Supportive remedial daycare      582    446
Intensive home-based services      749    540
Aftercare services      131    121
Total FBS Services 12,433 5,111*
  • *A family could receive >1 FBS service during the year.
  • Family Based Services are designed to strengthen families and increase a parent’s ability to protect their child, and are intended to prevent foster care placement or to return a child home as soon as possible.

 

2010:

  • areas where improvements are still needed, such as reducing the number of children in long-term foster care, improving the timeliness of adoptions and reducing Oregon’s still-too-high foster care placement rate

 

  • same family services as 2009 – FFY 2010 Family Services, by Type
Description Number of Services Families Served
Family decision meeting facilitation   4,046 2,719
Parent training services   2,575 1,572
Intensive family services   1,961 1,208
Family sexual abuse treatment      957    530
Intensive home-based services      662    439
Supportive remedial daycare      463    347
Aftercare services        96      90
Total FBS Services 10,760 4,818*
  • *A family could receive >1 FBS service during the year.

 

  • Family Based Services are designed to strengthen families and increase a parent’s ability to protect their child, and are intended to prevent foster care placement or to return a child home as soon as possible.

 

2011:

  • developing a new tool to meet the goals. Differential Response can transform child welfare’s engagement with families and in many cases, keep children safely at home after a founded incident of child abuse or neglect. Differential Response is based on the idea that “one-size-does-not-fit all,” and that families can be successful when interventions are crafted to meet the family’s specific challenges. Part of Oregon’s efforts to safely reduce the number of children in foster care focuses on building family and community support in a model of shared responsibility. Parents and families need concrete supports to address the underlying issues of neglect. In some cases, these supports are basic food, housing, transportation and employment. In more cases, the need is for culturally appropriate services, like drug/alcohol treatment, mental health treatment and parenting support and skill building

 

  • Differential Response will add an alternative child welfare intervention that focuses on assessing and ensuring child safety by engaging the family in partnership to keep their children safe. Differential Response will allow for the provision of earlier interventions in partnership with community-based organizations, providing an avenue for the reconnection of the family with their community. The traditional CPS response will continue to be used for higher risk cases where greater state intervention is needed to ensure children are safe

 

  • We didn’t create this concept, and Oregon is learning from the other 23 states where all or part of it is in place. We do, however, expect the transformation of our child protection system to a system of Differential Response will result in a more tailored way to keep children safe and families intact

 

  • new Oregon SACWIS (State Automated Child Welfare Information System). There are changes in the content of this section due to data conversion issues and changes in reference values. This may impact the inclusion of, or comparability to, data reported in prior years

 

  • All types of abuse decreased with the exception of neglect. The increase in neglect is due in part to several types of maltreatment for mental Injury being re-defined as part of Oregon’s data conversion, to now be included under neglect. [in other words, none of the other types of abuse actually decreased, they were merely renamed neglect]

 

  • state fiscal year (SFY) 2011, which goes from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011. This departure from the federal fiscal year (October through September) annual period is due to the implementation of Oregon’s new State Automated Child Welfare Information System (SACWIS), which has significantly delayed reporting. All efforts were made to allow for comparisons to be made for this data over time. However, please note that there is a 3-month overlap between the SFY 2011 data and FFY 2010

 

  • In late 2010 a substantial redesign in the contracts for in-home service provision affects the recorded data. In-home Safety and Reunification Services represent several services, as each service provider works to meet an individual family’s needs. In SFY 2011, 3 percent of children who were served in-home received in-home safety services [meaning 62.7% of children (victim of child abuse or neglect) who were served (remained) at home did not receive in-home safety services] [NOTE: These numbers do not correspond with numbers found in a chart in the same 2011 Data Book: Of 11,599 victims of child abuse or neglect, 8,685 (64.4%) remained at home, of those 8,685 victims who remained at home, 3,242 (25.5%) had in-home safety services, and 5,443 (74.5%) remained at home with no in-home safety services, and the case was closed. Even if the 37.3% “of children who were served in-home” represented 37.3% of the total 11,599 victims of child abuse or neglect, the resulting 4,326 children does not match the 3,242 children who were given in-home safety services in the chart. No explanation for the discrepancy is provided in the 2011 Data Book]

 

  • [NOTE: There is no chart showing the number of services and the number of families served, starting with the 2011 Data Book and going forward. It is unknown whether the decrease of 1,673 (13.5%) services and the decrease of 293 (5.7%) families served in 2010 has continued in 2011 and beyond. The lack of providing the information in the Data Books may provide the answer.]

 

2012:

  • new Oregon SACWIS (State Automated Child Welfare Information System). There are changes in the content of this section due to data conversion issues and changes in reference values. This may impact the inclusion of, or comparability to, data reported in prior years

 

  • current data represents federal fiscal year (FFY) 2012, which goes from October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012

 

  • 7,532 children were served in their homes, either before or after any foster care experience. All children served in-home receive case management and safety assessment services. In addition, just over 3,000 children (3,056 or 40.5 percent) receive other services. The main service is the In-Home Safety and Reunification Service. In-home Safety and Reunification Services are designed to strengthen families and increase a parent’s ability to protect their child, and are intended to prevent foster care placement [The wording in this section is deceptive. It is agreed that 7,532 children were “served in their home” which is termed “victims not removed from their home” in the chart. “All children served in-home receive case management and safety assessment services.” This is a deceiving statement, because those “services” are conducted at the initial assessment for every child assessed by CPS. 3,056 “receive other services” sounds like they get some bonuses, which they do: the “other services” are called an “in-home safety plan” in the chart. Thus, victims can be left at home with no safety plan and the case closed, as described below.]

 

“What happens in substantiated cases?

If a child has been abused or neglected, the course of action depends on State policy, the severity of the maltreatment, the risk of continued or future maltreatment, the services available to address the family’s needs, and whether the child was removed from the home and a court action to protect the child was initiated. The following general options are available:

  • No or low risk: The family’s case may be closed with no services if the maltreatment was a one-time incident, there is no or low risk of future incidents, or the services the family needs will not be provided through the child welfare agency, but through other systems.”[1]

 

  • If a child cannot remain safely at home, he or she is placed in foster care and the family receives services to assist them in making changes that will allow their child to safely return home. Other services children and their families received included: Parent Training and Education, Counseling and Therapeutic Services, Basic needs and Transportation Assistance

 

2013:

  • Oregon SACWIS (State Automated Child Welfare Information System) implemented in late 2011. There may be changes in the content of this publication due to changes in reference values. This may impact the inclusion of, or comparability to, data reported in prior years. The current data represents federal fiscal year (FFY) 2013, which goes from October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2013

 

  • All types of abuse increased with the exception of mental Injury

 

  • 8,003 children were served in their homes, either before or after any foster care experience. All children served in-home receive case management and safety assessment services. In addition, almost 2,800 children (2,783 or 34.8 percent) receive other services. [see comments in 2013 notes]

 

  • main service is the In-Home Safety and Reunification Service

 

  • Other services children and their families received included: Parent Training and Education, Counseling and Therapeutic Services, Basic needs and Transportation Assistance

 

2014:

  • Fatalities:
    • One child had an open Assessment at the time of the fatality;
    • One child had an open child welfare case at the time of the fatality;
    • No child was in the Department’s custody at the time of death;
    • There were four children who were the subject of a child abuse/neglect referral within one year of the date of death;
    • Two children’s families received family preservation services in the five years preceding the fatality

 

  • 6,453 children were served in their homes, either before or after any foster care experience. All children served in-home receive case management and safety assessment services. In addition, almost 2,500 children (2,472 or 38.3 percent) receive other services. [see comments in 2013 notes]

 

  • Two key family services available are In-Home Safety and Reunification Services (ISRS) and Strengthening, Preserving and Reunifying Families (SPRF) Program Services

 

  • ISRS provides a combination of concrete safety and change services that lead to improved parent protective capacity. Services are designed to protect children, stabilize the family, and assist parents in establishing linkages to formal, informal, and natural supports and resources so that a child can remain safely with their family without further intervention of Child Welfare.

 

  • SPRF services were created by the Oregon legislature in June 2011 (ORS 418.575-418.598). This was to specifically address the needs of children and families who come to the attention of child welfare through a report of abuse or neglect. These services are designed to support a comprehensive service array in local communities –specifically, these services are aimed at maintaining children safely in the home, reducing the lengths of stay in foster care and addressing re-abuse of children

 

  • SPRF services have an array of services to include but are not limited to; Navigators, Parent Training, Parent Mentoring, Relief Nursery, Alcohol and Drug Treatment, Housing, Front End Intervention, Reconnecting Families, Trauma and Therapeutic Services, Family Visitation, Transportation Services and Employment Related Services

 

  • Differential Response (DR) is a child welfare system transformation that provides the route for families to connect to their community and needed services without the need for an open child welfare case. All families involved with child welfare receive a comprehensive child safety assessment by child welfare staff

 

  • Differential Response is being implemented in staged phases with the initial counties of Lane, Klamath and Lake Counties, beginning in May 2014

 

  • Other services children and their families received included: Parent Training and Education, Counseling and Therapeutic Services, Basic Needs and Transportation Assistance

 

2015:

  • Fatalities:
    • Seven children had an open assessment at the time of the fatality.
    • One child had an open child welfare case at the time of the fatality.
    • One child had both an open assessment and open child welfare case at the time of the fatality.
    • Of the children with an open case, two children were in the Department’s custody at the time of death.
    • Six children’s families received family preservation services in the five years preceding the fatality.
    • Two children had been reunited with the parent or principal caregiver in the previous five years.

 

  • Two key family services available are In‐Home Safety and Reunification Services (ISRS) and Strengthening, Preserving and Reunifying Families (SPRF) Program Services

 

  • Each county in the state has implemented the SPRF program and has developed their individualized service array through a process to identify the services gaps and needs in their community. Some of the themes in the gaps and needs identified across the state are: Navigators, Parent Training, Parent Mentoring, Relief Nursery services, Alcohol and Drug Treatment, Housing, Front End Intervention, Reconnecting Families, Trauma and Therapeutic Services, Family Visitation, Transportation Services and Employment Related Services

 

  • Differential Response (DR) is a family‐centered approach which focuses on protecting children to ensure a successful future

 

  • DR is being implemented in staged phases which began in Lane, Klamath and Lake Counties, beginning in May 2014 and has expanded to nine more counties throughout 2015. On the last day of FFY 2015, counties who had implemented DR also included Benton, Lincoln, Linn, and Washington

 

  • If a child cannot remain safely at home, he or she is placed in foster care and the family receives services (including ISRS, SPRF, and other services) to assist them in making changes that will allow their child to safely return home

 

2016:

  • Many counts for this Data Book have increased more than the average between FFY 2015 and FFY 2016. This is due to a statewide effort to complete documentation for assessments that were more than 60 days old during the summer of 2016

 

  • While all types of abuse increased from the previous year, sexual abuse and physical abuse increased the most with sexual abuse increasing by 25.8% and physical abuse increasing by 20.7%

 

  • Fatalities:
    • One child had an open child welfare case at the time of the fatality.
    • Six children’s families received family preservation services in the five years preceding the fatality

 

  • 6,066 children were served in their homes, either before or after any foster care experience. All children served in-home receive case management and safety assessment services. In addition, over 2,500 children (2,535 or 41.8 percent) received other services. [see comments in 2013 notes]

 

  • Two key family services available are In-Home Safety and Reunification Services (ISRS) and Strengthening, Preserving and Reunifying Families (SPRF) Program Services

 

  • themes in the gaps and needs identified across the state are: Navigators, Parent Training, Parent Mentoring, Relief Nursery services, Alcohol and Drug Treatment, Housing, Front End Intervention, Reconnecting Families, Trauma and Therapeutic Services, Family Visitation, Transportation Services and Employment Related Services

 

  • Differential Response (DR) is a child safety focused family-centered approach. DR is a redesign of the child welfare system’s front end that allows more than one type of response to families with a screened in report of abuse or neglect

 

  • DR is being implemented in staged phases which began in Lane, Klamath and Lake Counties, beginning in May 2014 and has expanded to nine more counties. On the last day of FFY 2016, counties who had implemented DR also included Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Coos, Curry, Jackson, Josephine, Clackamas, and Washington

 

  • If a child cannot remain safely at home, he or she is placed in foster care and the family receives services (including ISRS, SPRF, and other services) to assist them in making changes that will allow their child to safely return home

 

2017:

  • While most types of abuse decreased from the previous year, mental injury and sexual abuse decreased the most with mental injury decreasing by 29% and sexual abuse decreasing by 18.3%

 

  • Fatalities:
    • Three children had an open child welfare case at the time of the fatality.
    • Seven children’s families received family preservation services in the five years preceding the fatality

 

  • 7,622 children were served in their homes, either before or after any foster care experience. All children served in-home receive case management and safety assessment services. In addition, over 3,000 children (3,197 or 41.9 percent) received other services. [see comments in 2013 notes]

 

  • Two key family services available are In-Home Safety and Reunification Services (ISRS) and Strengthening, Preserving and Reunifying Families (SPRF) Program Services

 

  • themes in the gaps and needs identified across the state are: Navigators, Parent Training, Parent Mentoring, Relief Nursery services, Alcohol and Drug Treatment, Housing, Front End Intervention, Reconnecting Families, Trauma and Therapeutic Services, Family Visitation, Transportation Services and Employment Related Services

 

  • Differential Response (DR) is a child safety focused family-centered approach. DR began in May 2014 through a staged implementation starting with Lane, Klamath, and Lake Counties. By April 2017, when DR was ended through Legislative action, it had expanded to include Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Coos, Curry, Jackson, Josephine, Clackamas, and Washington. [Differential Response was ended by Legislative Action in 2017. Why?]

 

  • If a child cannot remain safely at home, he or she is placed in foster care and the family receives services (including ISRS, SPRF, and other services) to assist them in making changes that will allow their child to safely return home

 

2018:

  • While most types of abuse increased from the previous year, mental injury and physical abuse increased the most with mental injury increasing by 50.6% and physical abuse increasing by 29.9%. [Any explanation why?]

 

  • 7,645 children were served in their homes. All children served in-home receive case management and safety services. Over 3,000 children (3,076 or 40.2 percent) also received additional services. [see comments in 2013 notes]

 

  • Services offered primarily fall within two categories: In-Home Safety and Reunification Services (ISRS) and Strengthening, Preserving and Reunifying Families (SPRF) Program Services

 

  • themes in the gaps and needs identified across the state are: Navigators, Parent Training, Parent Mentoring, Relief Nursery services, Alcohol and Drug Treatment, Housing, Front End Intervention, Reconnecting Families, Trauma and Therapeutic Services, Family Visitation, Transportation Services and Employment Related Services

 

  • If a child’s safety cannot be managed safely at home, they are placed in foster care and the family receives services (including ISRS, SPRF, and other services) to assist them in making changes that will allow their child to safely return home

 

2019:

  • During this time, Oregon Child Welfare consolidated fifteen regional hotlines into one operation over a period of eight months. The new centralized hotline, known as the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline, began serving the entire state on April 4, 2019. Prior to that, call volume data was not captured consistently throughout the state. Therefore, data is unavailable for FFY 2019. Since full centralization, available call volume data states that approximately 55% of the calls made to the hotline do not result in a screening report. [What are the criteria for not creating a report for 55% of the calls]

 

  • 7,271 children were served in their homes. All children served in-home receive case management and safety services. Over 2,800 children (2,836 or 34.8 percent) also received additional services. [see comments in 2013 notes]

 

  • Services offered primarily fall within two categories: In-Home Safety and Reunification Services (ISRS) and Strengthening, Preserving and Reunifying Families (SPRF) Program Services

 

  • themes in the gaps and needs identified across the state are: Navigators, Parent Training, Parent Mentoring, Relief Nursery services, Alcohol and Drug Treatment, Housing, Front End Intervention, Reconnecting Families, Trauma and Therapeutic Services, Family Visitation, Transportation Services and Employment Related Services

 

  • If a child’s safety cannot be managed safely at home, they are placed in foster care and the family receives services (including ISRS, SPRF, and other services) to assist them in making changes that will allow their child to safely return home

 

[1] How Does the Child Welfare System Work? https://www.mentalhelp.net/abuse/how-does-the-child-welfare-system-work/

 

Previous Page                                                                                Next Page

 

 

To submit questions or comments, please email Jo@Jo-Calk.com. I welcome all input, ideas, and suggestions. Thank you for caring for children.

Blessings,

Jo Calk