Pilot CWS-R-SAP – v. 1 Current CWS, 13.1. Reasons a Child is Removed From the Home

 

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Strategic Action Plan

 

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13.1. Reasons a Child is Removed From the Home

 

The following chart has been created from data in the annual Oregon Child Welfare Data Books for the years 2009 through 2019.

Reasons Child Removed from Home Chart
Reasons Child Removed from Home Chart

 

Data for the years 2009-2011 demonstrate a normal fluctuation in reasons children are taken from their home following a CPS assessment. Although the actual numbers and percentages vary over the years, there are 5 main reasons for removal in 2009-2011: Child Neglect Abuse, Parent Drug Abuse, Child Physical Abuse, Parent Alcohol Abuse, and Child Behavior, with Inability to Cope and Inadequate Housing not far behind.

 

Dramatic Change in 2012

There is a sudden and dramatic change to the data in 2012. From 2012 to the latest annual report in 2019, there are only 2 main reasons for removal of a child from their home: Child Neglect Abuse and Parent Drug Abuse. The highest main reason for removal in 2009-2011, Child Physical Abuse, has dropped significantly from the data. Child Physical Abuse now hovers been fifth and sixth as the reason for removal. Child Neglect Abuse moved from fourth to a significantly higher first reason.

 

Why the Change in 2012?

There are two ways to look at the dramatic change in 2012. The first is to believe that Child Physical Abuse, Parent Alcohol Abuse, and Child Behavior are no longer issues. A CPS program or service introduced to families in 2012 reduced those three previously main occurrences to practically trivial, in comparison to the huge spikes in Child Neglect Abuse and Parent Drug Abuse. In addition, that fantastic new CPS family program or service has been continued steadily from 2012 through 2019 and probably exists today. This is unlikely.

 

Alternative View

The second way to view the data is that a major shift in counting and tracking reasons for removing a child was introduced within CPS in early 2012. That change in counting resulted in a pattern that has been repeated every year since 2012. It is not because Child Physical Abuse, Parent Alcohol Abuse, Child Behavior, Ability to Cope, and Inadequate Housing suddenly disappeared from the majority of the families simultaneously in 2012 and continuously after that. It is more likely that those conditions still exist in families assessed by CPS, but CPS Caseworkers are focused on two main conditions – or lump many other conditions under two main conditions – Child Neglect Abuse and Parent Drug Abuse.

 

The Significance of the Change in 2012

Up through 2011, there were five major areas that needed to be addressed by CPS, plus two more areas that deserved more attention. In one year, the areas needing to be addressed were reduced from five (5) or seven (7) to only two (2). Given the reduction of areas to be addressed, it would make sense that CPS would focus family programs and services on those two areas. However, data from 2013-2019 indicate no change – perhaps even a slight increase – in these two areas. If family programs and services were, indeed, implemented between 2012-2019, they have not been effective.

 

Program and Service Implementations

To better understand the data, information about systems and methodologies used by CPS were reviewed from the same annual Oregon Child Welfare Data Books for the years 2009 through 2019. Major programs, services, changes, and implementations, by year 2009-2019 are included in the following chart:

Major Programs/Services In-Place or Implemented 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
Family decision meeting facilitation X X
Parent training services X X
Intensive family services X X
Family sexual abuse treatment X X
Supportive remedial daycare X X
Intensive home-based services X X
Aftercare services X X
Differential Response X X X X X
SACWIS (State Automated Child Welfare Information System) X X X X X X X X X
In-home Safety and Reunification Services X X X X X X X X X
Parent Training and Education X X X
Counseling and Therapeutic Services X X X
Basic needs X X X
Transportation Assistance X X X
Strengthening, Preserving and Reunifying Families (SPRF) Program Services, includes Navigators, Parent Training, Parent Mentoring, Relief Nursery, Alcohol and Drug Treatment, Housing, Front End Intervention, Reconnecting Families, Trauma and Therapeutic Services, Family Visitation, Transportation Services and Employment Related Services X X X X X X
Themes in the gaps and needs identified across the state are: Navigators, Parent Training, Parent Mentoring, Relief Nursery services, Alcohol and Drug Treatment, Housing, Front End Intervention, Reconnecting Families, Trauma and Therapeutic Services, Family Visitation, Transportation Services and Employment Related Services X X X X X
Oregon Child Abuse Hotline consolidation X

 

Major 2011-2012 Change

The introduction of the SACWIS automated system during 2011 appears to be the major impactor affecting the data in 2012 and beyond. This theory is supported by statements in the Oregon Child Welfare Data Books for the years 2011 and 2012:

 

From the 2011 Data Book:

“[The] new Oregon SACWIS (State Automated Child Welfare Information System). There are changes in the content of this section due to data conversion issues and changes in reference values. This may impact the inclusion of, or comparability to, data reported in prior years.”

 

From the 2012 Data Book:

“[The] new Oregon SACWIS (State Automated Child Welfare Information System). There are changes in the content of this section due to data conversion issues and changes in reference values. This may impact the inclusion of, or comparability to, data reported in prior years.”

 

 

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To submit questions or comments, please email Jo@Jo-Calk.com. I welcome all input, ideas, and suggestions. Thank you for caring for children.

Blessings,

Jo Calk